Adams Group

Dr. Peter Adams

Carnegie Mellon University, Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Department of Engineering and Public Policy

Ph.D., Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 2001
MS, Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 1998
BS, Chemical Engineering, Cornell University, 1996

Publications
Curriculum Vitae
email: petera AT andrew.cmu.edu


Graduate Students

From Left to Right: Yunha Lee, Shantanu Jathar, Peter Adams, Dan Westervelt

More group photos

Shantanu Jathar

Department of Engineering and Public Policy

Co-advised by: Allen Robinson

 

BE, Mechanical Engineering, Government College of Engineering Pune, 2004

MS, Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 2007

 

My research focuses on understanding the sources, chemistry and properties of organic aerosol. My first project involved the development of an organic aerosol model that treated POA as semi-volatile and reactive. The organic aerosol model, run in conjunction with a climate model (GISS GCM II'), performed much better than previous models when evaluated against a suite of observations. Currently, I am working on modeling secondary organic aerosol formed from various combustion sources in smog chamber experiments.

 

Personal website | Resume

email: sjathar AT andrew.cmu.edu

Dan Westervelt

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

 

BS, Civil Engineering, Purdue University, 2008

MS, Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2009

 

My main research goal is to advance scientific understanding of the effect of airborne particulate matter on the environment, particularly climate. To meet this goal, my work focuses on global aerosol microphysics modeling using two different models: GISS-TOMAS and GEOS-Chem/TOMAS. I am especially interested in the ability of aerosols formed via nucleation (new particle formation) to grow and survive to CCN-relevant sizes. Additionally, I have done work in the area of
marine organic aerosol emissions and their influence on CCN concentrations.

 

Personal website

email: dan.westervelt AT gmail.com

Britney McCoy

Department of Engineering and Public Policy

Co-advised by: Paul Fishbeck, David Gerard

 

Britney McCoy is currently a Ph.D. Candidate of the Department of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University, where expected completion will be August 2010. Britney's area of research examines the complexity of petroleum refinery upset air emissions and how these emissions impact the health and exposure of neighboring communities. The objective of the work is to characterize upsets, model dispersion, and assess exposure across populations with the environmental justice implications of such emissions. Other research interests include environmental management, air quality, sustainability, health & environmental policy analysis and environmental justice. In 2005, Britney graduated from Lafayette College with honors with a dual-major in AB Engineering and Government & Law.

 

Personal Website

email: bmccoy AT andrew.cmu.edu

Anirban Roy

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Co-advised by: Allen Robinson

 

My work involves estimating the bias in organic carbon source apportionment in receptor models due to reaction of source tracers.

 

email: anirban1 AT andrew.cmu.edu

Ashwin Kumar

Department of Engineering and Public Policy

Co-advised by: Benoît Morel

 

My research explores the indirect effects of black carbon aerosol on global climate.

 

email: ashwink AT cmu.edu

 

Alyssa Moore

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

 

BS, Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, 2010

 

Ammonia from agricultural sources.

 

email: alyssamo AT andrew.cmu.edu

 

Adams Group Alumni

Susanna Ehlers

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

BS, Geography, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2007

I am currently working to integrate nucleation into GEOS-Chem, a global CTM. Model evaluation is a key component to the research I am undertaking.

email: sehlers AT cmu.edu


Elisabeth Gilmore

Department of Chemical Engineering and Department of Engineering and Public Policy
Co-advised by: Prof. Lester Lave

B.A.Sc., Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Toronto, Canada, 2000
M.A.Sc., Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Toronto, Canada, 2002

My research focuses the quantification of social and environmental externalities of energy generation with an emphasis on the impact of the air emissions on urban air quality. Of specific interest is the quantification of the human health impact for policy applications. This work is funded by the Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center (CEIC) and the Achievement Rewards for College Scientists (ARCS).

Curriculum Vitae
email: eagilmor AT andrew.cmu.edu


JaeGun Jung

Department of Chemical Engineering
Co-advised by Prof. Spyros Pandis

B.S., Chemical Engineering, Hanyang University, Korea, 2003

I developed a new aerosol simulation model (DMAN: the Dynamic Model for Aerosol Nucleation). Ternary nucleation (H2SO4, H2O, and NH3), condensation, and coagulation are explicitly simulated with a two-moment (number and mass) algorithm. DMAN deals sulfate, ammonium, and organic matter as components of particles. According to a result of the model simulation, nucleation period can be divided as two phases. The first part is forming new particles with neutral growth because of an abundance of ammonia. The second part is acidic growth without forming new particles [Atmospheric Environment, in press]. I am now incorporating DMAN into the 3D chemical transport model, CAMx.

Curriculum Vitae
email: jgj AT andrew.cmu.edu


Yunha Lee

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Co-advised by Prof. Cliff Davidson

I am working on the mineral dust aerosol implementation on GISS GCM global aerosol model and the model evaluation using remote sensing data. I am interested in the aerosol indirect effect especially the giant CCN effect by mineral dust.

email: yunhal AT andrew.cmu.edu


Jeff Pierce

Department of Chemical Engineering
Co-advised by Dr. Spyros Pandis

BS, Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, 2003
Ph.D., Department of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 2008

Now a professor of Physics and Atmospheric Science at Dalhousie University (http://fizz.phys.dal.ca/~pierce/)

While working with Peter and Spyros Pandis, I explored the connection of ultrafine atmospheric aerosols, cloud condensation nuclei and climate. Now I try to keep up the good work with my own group at Dalhousie.
 

Curriculum Vitae
email: jrpierce AT andrew.cmu.edu


Pavan N Racherla

Department of Engineering and Public Policy

B.Tech, Mechanical Engineering, 2001 &
M.Tech, Energy Systems Engineering, 2003, I.I.T Bombay

My research interests include studying the impacts of climate change on global chemistry, smart techniques to model air quality and meteorological episodes, and model development and evaluation. For the global climate and chemistry modeling I am working with a unified model of climate, gas phase chemistry, and bulk aerosols. Related interests include coupling the global model with regional meteorological and chemistry models. The eventual goal is to understand how global climate change impacts regional air quality in the United States

To view my Resume or visit my Homepage click here
email: pavanracherla@cmu.edu


Win Trivitayanurak

B.Eng, Environmental Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok Thailand, 2000
M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 2004
Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 2008
Postdoc, School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, 2009-2010
Currently an Environmental Specialist at Department of Highways, Ministry of Transport, Bangkok, Thailand.
 

Win incorporated the size-resolved aerosol microphysics into the GEOS-Chem chemistry-transport model (CTM). This improvement to GEOS-Chem enabled the evaluation of the microphysics against high time-resolution field campaign data, which will consequently improve the quality of CCN prediction and likely reduce the uncertainty in aerosol indirect effect estimation. He is currently working for the Thai Government looking at environmental impacts of roads and sustainable development of the transport sector.

Curriculum Vitae
email: win.trivitayanurak AT gmail.com

Rob Pinder

Department of Engineering and Public Policy and Department of Civil Engineering

B.S. Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (Minor in Economics), MIT, 1999
M.Eng. Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT, 2000
Ph.D. Engineering and Public Policy and Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 2005

Rob Pinder's thesis focused on improving the temporal and spatial variation in agricultural ammonia emissions, developing tools for evaluating ammonia emission inventories using regional air quality models, and assessing the cost-effectiveness of reductions on ammonia emissions for the control of PM2.5. He currently has a post doctoral research position with the Environmental Protection Agency.

Publications | Curriculum Vitae | Personal Site
email: Pinder.Rob AT epamail.epa.gov

Kaiping Chen

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

MS, Environmental Engineering, Tsinghua University, 2002
BS, Environmental Engineering, Tsinghua University, 2000

I am studying carbonaceous aerosols and mineral dust using a highly size-resolved simulation of aerosol microphysics, size distributions, number and mass concentrations in the GISS general circulation model (GCM). The indirect effects of carbonaceous aerosols and mineral dust on climate are studied by predicting the CCN concentrations in this model as a first step.

Curriculum Vitae
email: kaipingc AT andrew.cmu.edu


John Dawson

Department of Chemical Engineering and Department of Engineering and Public Policy
Co-advised by
Prof. Spyros Pandis

BS, Chemical Engineering, Villanova University, 2003

I am working on the effects of climate change on future air quality. I am especially interested in atmospheric chemistry and how it will change in the future. I hope to work on issues of air quality policy.

email: jpdawson AT andrew.cmu.edu


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